By Deborah Cupples (based on  version printed in South Florida Sun-Sentinel) Don’t take your voting rights for granted because errors could stop any of us from successfully voting in November, even if we voted in the primaries. Below are five ways to help protect your voting rights, along with some how’s and why’s: (1) ...

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IRAC is an acronym for Issue, Rule, Application and Conclusion.  I imagine every law school in America teaches its students to use some variation of IRAC as the structure for analyzing a legal issue.  And IRAC works fine if the analysis is simple, like this: Issue The issue in this case is ...

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A lawyer’s writing skills (or lack thereof) can have a direct—even severe—impact on clients’ interests. Did an employer owe a former employee a $7.5 million commission? The court’s answer hinged on imprecise word usage in an employment contract. (Langford v. Paravant, 912 So.2d 359, (Fla. Dist. Ct. App. (2005)) Did an insurance ...

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President-elect Donald Trump has vowed to reverse many of President Obama’s executive actions. But with a mere stroke of the pen, can one president so easily undo the work of his predecessor? At least in the context of national monuments, the answer is likely “no.” President Obama has created or enlarged ...

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Seeking data about how to make law-school graduates more practice-ready, the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System conducted its "Foundations for Practice" survey in 2014-15.  More than 24,000 lawyers in the U.S. participated. The lawyers rated the importance of 147 skills, competencies, and traits (called "foundations") in one of four ways: (1)  “Necessary immediately for ...

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A recent Illinois Supreme Court opinion added fuel to the long debate over "shall," a word historically used to convey a mandatory or prohibited action in contracts and legislation. (Thanks to Legal Writing Prof for posting about it.) In People v. Geiler, the defendant argued that a traffic citation should be ...

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During my introduction to contract drafting last week, I reviewed with my students a contracts case that hinged on the meaning of a common, four-letter word: “sale.” Many lawyers wouldn’t think to look up “sale” in a dictionary because everyone "knows" what it means. That seemingly clear word caused a $7.5 million ...

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Originally posted on Education Law Prof Blog where Professor Nance was a guest blogger. Read the original post here. In re Expulsion of A.D. describes the expulsion of a student in southern Minnesota for accidentally bringing a small pocketknife to school. A school liaison officer found the knife while conducting a random ...

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