Winston Nagan's Blog

Professor Nagan was born in South Africa and educated at the University of Fort Hare. At that time, the apartheid authorities were constructing the foundations of a police state. Professor Nagan as a student leader was active in promoting the rule of law values, which challenged the values of apartheid authoritarianism. In this role, he was active in organizing legal defenses for political prisoners. Later he organized a prison education scheme for the continuing education of all political prisoners in South Africa. He left South Africa for exile in 1964 and continued his legal studies at Oxford University. He graduated with the degrees of BA honors and MA. He continued his studies at Duke University, LL.M, MCL. He did his doctoral studies at Yale under Myres McDougal and Michael Reisman (JSD). He left Yale for a position in the University of Florida where he currently is Sam T. Dell Research Scholar Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Human Rights and Peace. He is presently Chair of the Board of Trustees on the World Academy of Art & Science; Fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts; Fellow of the Academy advancing the Academy’s interest in the global rule of law. Professor Nagan served as Chair of Amnesty International USA, and President, Policy Sciences Center. He is widely published in international law and human rights, and has taught and lectured in at least 20 universities worldwide. He has been awarded Distinguished International Educator by UF (2005), Faculty of the Year by UF Law (2013), Bahia Human Rights Award (2002) and the Mandela Freedom Award by UF (2014). Served as Acting Justice on the High Court of the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa (2006).

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Originally appeared on Reader Supported News. The presidential debate has a radical divide. There are strong coterie of republican want-to-be’s who strongly believe that they constitute presidential timber. The problem they represent is their ability to generate problems and issues that are deminimous as matters of public policy and in some ...

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