Nancy Dowd's Blog

Nancy Dowd’s research focuses on social justice issues connected to family law, juvenile law, constitutional law, race and gender analysis, and social change theories. She is currently engaged in research about a developmental model of equality, using the life course of African American boys from birth to age 18. Her recent books are Justice for Kids (NYU Press 2011), which identifies better solutions for kids than the current juvenile justice system, and A New Juvenile Justice System (NYU Press 2015), which articulates the vision of a new youth justice system focused on child well being and public safety. Her other recent book is The Man Question: Male Privilege and Subordination (2010), on masculinities theories as a means to expand gender analysis and also incorporate other hierarchies that affect gender, particularly race and class.

Dowd served as the Director of the Center on Children and Families until 2015, and in that role focused on issues of juvenile justice, social justice, non-traditional families, gay and lesbian rights, and collaboration with the Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations on issues of race and families. CCF also established the Intimate Partner Violence Assistance Clinic led by Professor Teresa Drake, a groundbreaking collaboration between law and medicine. She teaches family law and constitutional law.

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Originally posted in Concurring Opinions where Professor Dowd was  to be a guest blogger for the month of May. Read the original post here.  We live in a time where we can accurately predict the risks and opportunities for many children.  As surely as if we marked them at birth (or even before), we ...

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Originally posted in Concurring Opinions where Professor Dowd was  to be a guest blogger for the month of May. Read the original post here.    Amidst a recent move, I had one of those conversations that happen for those of us who teach family law.  My mover, Big Mike, about halfway through the day, discovered ...

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Originally posted in Concurring Opinions where Professor Dowd was  to be a guest blogger for the month of May. Read the original post here.  Men’s care work and wage work both are powerfully impacted by the dynamic of masculinities. Masculinities are the male equivalent of female gender norms; they are plural because there are ...

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